Two pool recovery sessions to complete after your training

Posted on August 28, 2020 by

There are two primary types of recovery sessions you can do in pools. These are typically divided up in to “active” and “passive” recovery techniques – this can be a little misleading as you are actually “active” in both techniques.

When determining which session is most beneficial the rule of thumb is that immediately post-intense exercise or competition, recovery should be more passive.

As you get further away from the session or game, increasing the active nature of the session is important. This is largely due to what happens to the body after intense exercise, muscle damage, accumulation of waste products and the absence of muscle glycogen (energy).

Trying to do too much intensity too early can cause more damage to recovering tissue and subsequently affect future performance.




So, why use water?

Water’s hydrostatic characteristics – buoyancy (unloading of bodyweight) and temperature (cool water aids in pain relief and inflammation) – all assist the body in aiding the recovery process.

Guiding Principles

  • Try to stay in water that is waist deep. This makes it easier to move and stretch.
  • Aim for 15-25 minutes in duration
  • This should be performed at a low to moderate intensity
  • Water temperature – While cool or cold water is beneficial, you don’t want the water to be so cold that you can’t stay in the water for the desired duration or moving makes it too cold so you stay frozen in place. This won’t help in the recovery process.

  

Session One

Complete this session between 0-18 hours post-training

Water depth should be at waist-to-chest height; swim if the water is too deep. Make sure to have a drink bottle with you for the session.

Begin with 25 metre distances of each these exercises:

  1. Jog forwards
  2. Jog backwards
  3. Side ½ squat stepping, changing sides half way
  4. Swim breaststroke
  5. High knee walking forwards & backwards, changing sides half way
  6. Swim sidestroke

Standing in chest deep water, 15 repetitions of each of the following:

  1. Hip flexion & extension
  2. Hip abduction & adduction
  3. Shoulder horizontal abduction & adduction
  4. Trunk lateral flexion
  5. Squatting trunk rotations
  6. Hip flexion & outward rotation
  7. Hip flexion & inward rotation

Return to some further 25 metre distances:

  1. Jog forwards
  2. Walking lunge forwards with arms
  3. Walking lunch backwards with arms
  4. Carioca
  5. Carioca

Complete this session with three repetitions of:

  1. Two minutes in a spa/shower
  2. Stretch
  3. 20 seconds in a cool pool

 

Session Two

Complete this session after 18+ hours post-training

Make sure to have a drink bottle with you for the session.

Begin with 25 metre distances of each these exercises:

  1. Jog forwards
  2. Jog backwards
  3. Swim backstroke
  4. High knee walking forwards
  5. Swim breaststroke
  6. High knee walking backwards
  7. Swim sidestroke

Standing in chest deep water, 15 repetitions of each of the following:

  1. Hip flexion & extension
  2. Hip abduction & adduction
  3. Shoulder horizontal abduction & adduction
  4. Trunk lateral flexion
  5. Squatting trunk rotations
  6. Hip flexion & outward rotation
  7. Hip flexion & inward rotation

Return to some further 25 metre distances:

  1. Walking lunge forwards with arms
  2. Swim underwater
  3. Walking lunch backwards with arms
  4. Swim underwater
  5. Walk forwards
  6. Jump & dive
  7. Walk backwards
  8. Carioca

Complete this session with three repetitions of:

  1. Two minutes in a spa/shower
  2. Stretch
  3. 20 seconds in a cool pool

 

Definitions

  • Hip flexion & extension – Move your leg/knee towards your trunk then away from your trunk
  • Hip abduction & adduction – Move your leg away to the side and back again
  • Shoulder horizontal abduction & adduction – Move your arms across and away from the middle of your trunk
  • Trunk lateral flexion – Bend at the hips side to side
  • Squatting trunk rotations – As you move in to a sitting position rotate to look over your shoulder
  • Hip flexion & outward rotation – Bring your knee to your trunk then out to the side
  • Hip flexion & inward rotation – Bring your leg up like you are hurdling and then return to the midline of your body

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